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A Force of Nature

It’s well known that the calcium in milk contributes to bone health and the maintenance of our teeth. But did you know that milk is also a natural source of many other nutrients that are vital for maintaining good health, whatever your age? Like protein, iodine, vitamin B2 and vitamin B12.

This makes milk a force of nature.

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A source of many nutrients

Life can be pretty hectic - working, learning, playing, exercising, getting things organised…so make sure you’ve got the natural force of milk on your side!

Read more
Read more

Milk, nutrition and health

Balance and variety is key to a healthy diet. Indeed, in recent decades, the range of foods available has steadily increased. As a result, however, a new phenomenon has emerged: choice stress! Could going back to basics be part of the solution?

Read more
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Video

A powerful international campaign

In this new campaign, the hidden natural strengths of milk are put in the spotlight. Milk is a true force of nature because it contains a unique mix of nutrients that can help you manage the battles of the day!

A new world and a unique identity have been created, showing the awesome power of milk and its tangible benefits. It’s illustrated using mythical-world characters with a strong visual impact to deliver the message in a compelling way.

Read more
Read more

Milk recipes

Milk and milk products are enjoyable and versatile. Did you know that heat has little impact on the calcium content of food? This means that cooked meals containing milk retain the calcium and can help you meet your recommended daily intake from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group.

Read more
Read more

Frequently asked questions

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A Force of Nature

It’s well known that the calcium in milk contributes to bone health and the maintenance of our teeth. But did you know that milk is also a natural source of many other nutrients that are vital for maintaining good health, whatever your age? Like protein, iodine, vitamin B2 and vitamin B12. This makes milk a force of nature.

Milk - a unique package

Enjoyed as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle, milk is naturally delicious, versatile and a source of many essential nutrients.

As well as providing calcium, milk also provides a range of other important nutrients including protein, iodine, vitamins B2 and vitamin B12. These all play important roles for our health. Calcium and protein, for example, are needed for bone health. Iodine and vitamin B2 contribute to skin health and energy metabolism. And vitamin B12 plays a role in the function of the immune system.

The Department of Health’s Food Pyramid recommends three servings from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group each day. Between the ages of 9-18 years, five servings daily are recommended. Examples of one serving include an average 200ml glass of milk, 125ml (standard pot) of yogurt or 25g of hard cheese.

The natural goodness of milk

Milk is a natural source of goodness and it’s very easy to include and enjoy as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.

Not a big fan of drinking pure milk? It’s worth remembering that milk is extremely versatile. It’s perfect in smoothies, served with breakfast cereals, or for use in a variety of cooked and baked dishes.

Check out our recipe page for lots of tasty dishes in which you can include milk.

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A source of many nutrients

Life can be pretty hectic - working, learning, playing, exercising, getting things organised…so make sure you’ve got the natural force of milk on your side!

A unique mix of nutrients

The unique mix of essential nutrients turns each glass of milk into a true force of nature.

With its unique combination of nutrients, milk is a valuable daily ally to have – and one that fits perfectly within a balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle.

An enjoyable and natural drink providing protein, vitamins and minerals

It’s well known that the calcium in milk contributes to bone health and the maintenance of our teeth. But did you know that milk is also a natural source of many other nutrients that are vital for maintaining good health, whatever your age?

For example, protein contributes to bone health as well as the growth and maintenance of muscles. What’s more, vitamin B12 plays a role in the function of the immune system. Iodine has a role in energy metabolism and skin health. And vitamin B2 reduces tiredness and fatigue.

Are you reaching your recommended intake of milk and milk products every day? The Department of Health’s Food Pyramid recommends three servings from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group each day. Between the ages of 9-18 years, five servings daily are recommended. Examples of one serving include an average 200ml glass of milk, 125ml (standard pot) of yogurt or 25g of hard cheese.

Milk, a natural nutrient powerhouse

A serving of milk is equal to about 200mls (an average glass). A serving of low-fat milk, for example, provides an adult with approximately*

  • 30% of the RDA for calcium
  • 40% of the RDA for iodine
  • 34% of the RDA for vitamin B2
  • 72% of the RDA for vitamin B12
  • and only 92 kcals!

*Reference: COMMISSION DIRECTIVE 2008/100/EC: Vitamins and minerals and their recommended daily allowances. Official Journal of the European Union.

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Milk, nutrition and health

Balance and variety is key to a healthy diet. Indeed, in recent decades, the range of foods available has steadily increased. As a result, however, a new phenomenon has emerged: choice stress! Could going back to basics be part of the solution?

Recommended daily intake for each age group

Adopting a positive attitude to our diet and lifestyle is important. Healthy family practices can also set a good example – helping to ensure our own, and our family’s health and wellbeing.

The Department of Health’s Food Pyramid recommends three servings from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group each day. Between the ages of 9-18 years, five servings daily are recommended. Examples of one serving include an average 200ml glass of milk, 125ml (standard pot) of yogurt or 25g of hard cheese. The wide range of low fat/reduced fat options from this food group remain an important source of nutritional goodness, providing plenty of variety and choice.


A healthy diet for a healthy weight

Both healthy dietary habits and an active lifestyle are recommended for effective weight management. If you are ‘watching your weight’ or trying to lose weight, it is essential that your diet remains balanced and that your nutrient requirements are still met. By cutting out an entire food group, the nutritional quality of your diet is very likely to be affected.

The relationship between dairy foods and body weight is often misunderstood. Many people mistakenly believe that they should avoid or limit their intake from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group. However, did you know that Irish whole milk typically contains just 3.5% fat, that semi-skimmed milk contains no more than 1.8% fat and that skimmed milk has no more than 0.5% fat? There are also a wide range of lower-fat yogurt and cheese varieties on our supermarket shelves to choose from. These allow us to enjoy this food group as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle even if we are ‘watching our weight’.

Back

to homepage

Milk recipes

Milk and milk products are enjoyable and versatile. Did you know that heat has little impact on the calcium content of food? This means that cooked meals containing milk retain the calcium and can help you meet your recommended daily intake from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group.

Of course you can drink milk on its own. Or you can add it to something else. Enjoy a smoothie made with milk and fresh fruit. Coffee with foamed milk makes a delicious frothy latte. Milk can also be incorporated into many cooked and baked dishes.

Multi-Seed Brown Bread

Makes 12 slices

Ingredients

  • 200g plain flour
  • 350g wholemeal flour
  • 50g bran
  • 25g wheat germ
  • 2 heaped tsp baking powder (bread soda)
  • Pinch salt
  • 6 heaped tbsp mixed seeds (pumpkin, poppy, linseed, sunflower, etc)
  • 80g dried fruit
  • 1- 1 ½ pints low fat milk

Method

  1. Mix all dry ingredients together in a large bowl.
  2. Add enough milk to moisten sufficiently.
  3. Place in a 2lb baking tin and put into the oven at 180°C, 350°F, Gas mark 4 for approx. 1 hour.
  4. Tap the back to see if it sounds hollow when turned out.
  5. Leave on a wire rack to cool.

Exotic Pineapple, Orange & Honey Extravaganza


Serves 3

Ingredients

  • 150ml milk
  • Half a fresh pineapple peeled and diced
  • 250g low fat natural yogurt
  • 50g honey
  • 50ml freshly squeezed orange juice
  • Add the zest of one orange

Method

Whizz all ingredients together and serve cold

Tuna Chowder


Serves 4

Ingredients

  • Dessertspoon rapeseed or olive oil
  • 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 2 sticks of celery, trimmed and finely sliced
  • 1 tablespoon plain flour
  • 600ml skimmed milk
  • 200g can tuna in water
  • 320g can sweet corn in water, drained
  • 2 teaspoon freshly chopped thyme
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a large heavy based saucepan. Add the onion and celery and gently cook for about 5 minutes, stirring from time to time until the onion is softened.
  2. Stir in the flour and cook for about 1 minute to thicken.
  3. Draw the pan off the heat and gradually pour in the milk, stirring throughout.
  4. Add the tuna and its liquid, the drained sweet corn and the thyme.
  5. Mix gently, then bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
  6. Remove the pan from the heat and season to taste with the tiniest pinch of salt and lots of pepper.
  7. Sprinkle the chowder with the cayenne pepper and chopped parsley. Divide into soup bowls and serve immediately.

Potato & Parsnip Soup

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp rapeseed or olive oil
  • 2 large parsnips
  • 3 large potatoes
  • 1 medium onion
  • 2 tsp curry powder
  • 850ml vegetable stock
  • 150ml milk
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. Peel and chop the parsnips, potatoes and onion.
  2. Heat the oil in a saucepan.
  3. Add the potatoes, parsnips and onions, season with pepper and coat the vegetables in the oil.
  4. Cover with a lid and sweat over a low heat for about 10 minutes, adding the curry powder after about 5 minutes.
  5. Add the stock and bring to the boil.
  6. Continue cooking until the vegetables are soft.
  7. Whiz the soup until smooth with a blender or food processor.
  8. Add the milk and season to taste.
  9. Serve piping hot.

Tomato Soup

A wonderful thick, creamy consistency is achieved by using potato and skimmed milk in this recipe.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1tbsp rapeseed or olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 large potato, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • ¼ tsp each of dried basil, thyme and dill
  • Tiny pinch of salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper
  • 600ml (1 pint) passata (smooth sieved tomatoes)
  • 1 tsp sugar to bring out the best flavour of the tomato
  • 350ml skimmed milk

Method

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan.
  2. Cook the onion, potato, garlic and herbs for 5 minutes.
  3. Add the seasoning, passata and sugar.
  4. Bring to the boil and simmer for approximately 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are soft.
  5. Liquidise the soup.
  6. Add the milk and heat through until just hot.

Smoked Haddock, Mushroom and Cream Pie

A colourful and creamy fish and vegetable dish.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

  • 700g floury potatoes
  • 700g smoked haddock, or smoked cod, fillets
  • 110g mushrooms, washed and sliced
  • 110g Irish butter
  • 60ml Irish milk
  • 1 onion, peeled and very finely chopped
  • zest and juice of half a lemon
  • 300ml double Irish cream
  • 4 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
  • 4 heaped tbsp peas
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 red pepper, deseeded, grilled and cut into cubes (optional)
  • OR 2 carrots, cut into batons and cooked until just tender (optional)

For the topping

  • 4 tbsp finely grated Irish cheddar mixed with 2 tbsp of fresh breadcrumbs

Preparation & cooking

  1. Steam potatoes until tender then, while still hot, mash thoroughly so that no lumps remain. Add 60g/2oz butter and the milk and season to taste with salt and freshly ground pepper.
  2. Meanwhile, place the fish in a pan, cover with boiling water and simmer for one minute. Drain, slip off skin, remove any bones and gently separate into flakes. Place fish in a pie dish or, if you prefer, in four individual ovenproof dishes.
  3. Melt remaining butter in a pan and fry the sliced onion gently until soft but not coloured. Add sliced mushrooms and raise the heat and cook briskly until they begin to brown. Stir in the peas and the peppers or carrots (if using).
  4. Sprinkle with the lemon zest and juice. Spread vegetables evenly over the fish. Pour over the cream and add parsley. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper.
  5. Spread potatoes over the top using a fork. If using the topping spread the cheese and breadcrumb mixture on top.
  6. Bake in an oven preheated to 200°C/400°F/gas 6 (for fan ovens about 10°/20°F lower) for about 20 minutes.
  7. If preparing earlier and the contents are cold, cook for an extra 10-15 minutes.

Cheese and Broccoli Soup

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

  • 2 large heads broccoli (about 900g/2lb in weight)
  • 600ml water
  • 40g butter
  • 40g plain flour
  • 600ml milk
  • 90g mature Irish cheddar, grated
  • salt and freshly ground pepper

To garnish

Finely grated mature Irish cheddar OR lightly whipped cream

Method

  1. Melt the butter in a heavy bottomed pot; stir in the flour, a little salt and pepper and cook for one minute. Remove from the heat and add the milk, whisking all the time.
  2. Return to the heat and cook at a fast simmer for two minutes. Take off the heat, add the cheese and stir until melted.
  3. Prepare broccoli by trimming the base of the stalk and peeling tough skin from stalk. Cut into very thin slices. Break broccoli into florets.
  4. Bring water to a fast boil; add broccoli and cook until tender. Buzz the broccoli and water in a food processor or pass though a food mill until smooth.
  5. Combine broccoli purée and cheese sauce and reheat gently.
  6. Check seasoning, adding more salt and pepper if necessary. Garnish with grated cheese or a spoonful of lightly whipped cream. Serve with a wholemeal buttermilk scone or soda bread.

Cheesy Scones

Preparation time: less than 30 mins

Cooking time: 10 to 15 mins

Makes 8-12 scones

Ingredients

  • 225g self-raising flour
  • 55g pure Irish butter
  • 25g mature Irish cheddar cheese, grated
  • 150ml milk
  • pinch of salt (optional)

Method

  1. Heat the oven to 220C / 425F / Gas 7. Lightly grease a baking sheet.
  2. Mix together the flour (and salt) and rub in the butter.
  3. Stir in the cheese and then the milk to get a soft dough.
  4. Turn on to a floured work surface and knead very lightly. Pat out to a round 2cm / ¾ inches thick. Use a 5cm / 2 inch cutter to stamp out rounds and place on the baking sheet. Lightly knead together the rest of the dough and stamp out more scones to use it all up.
  5. Brush the tops of the scones with a little milk. Bake for 12-15 minutes until well risen and golden.
  6. Cool on a wire rack.

Rice Pudding

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 700mls milk
  • 100g pudding rice
  • 50g brown sugar
  • 2tbsp raisins
  • Pinch grated nutmeg or cinnamon
  • 10g butter to grease baking dish

Method

  1. Heat oven to 150 °C/fan 130°C. Wash the rice and drain well. Butter a 850ml baking dish, then tip in the rice and sugar. Stir in the milk.
  2. Stir in the raisins and sprinkle the nutmeg/cinnamon over the top.
  3. Cook for approximately 2 hours.

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A powerful international campaign

In this new campaign, the hidden natural strengths of milk are put in the spotlight. Milk is a true force of nature because it contains a unique mix of nutrients that can help you manage the battles of the day!

A new world and a unique identity have been created, showing the awesome power of milk and its tangible benefits. It’s illustrated using mythical-world characters with a strong visual impact to deliver the message in a compelling way.



The campaign idea: Milk, a force of nature

An epic TV commercial



The Making Of ...

Discover step by step how the TV commerical was made.

Print Images

This mythical world symbolises the power of the many nutrients that milk provides.

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FAQ

What are the recommended servings from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group?

The Department of Health’s Food Pyramid recommends three servings from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group each day. Between the ages of 9-18 years, five servings daily are recommended due to the importance of calcium during this life stage. Examples of one serving include 200ml of milk, 125ml of yogurt or 25g of hard cheese. Remember, the wide range of low fat/reduced fat options from this food group remain an important source of nutritional goodness, providing plenty of variety and choice.

What is the role of calcium?

Milk is an important source of the mineral calcium, needed for the growth and development of bone in children and the maintenance of our bones and teeth. Approximately 99% of the body’s calcium is found in our bones and teeth. Apart from its role in bone and dental health, calcium plays a role in normal blood coagulation; energy metabolism; normal muscle function and neurotransmission; and normal function of enzymes involved in digestion. Milk can be easily enjoyed as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.

Is calcium the only important nutrient found in milk?

In addition to calcium, milk provides a range of other important nutrients such as protein, iodine, vitamins B2 and vitamin B12. Calcium and protein are needed for bone health. Iodine and vitamin B2 contribute to skin health and energy metabolism. And vitamin B12 plays an important role in the function of the immune system.

Can milk be included in my diet if I’m ‘watching my weight’?

The relationship between dairy foods and body weight is often misunderstood. Many people mistakenly believe that they should avoid or limit their intake from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group. However, did you know that Irish whole milk typically contains just 3.5% fat, that semi-skimmed milk contains no more than 1.8% fat and that skimmed milk has no more than 0.5% fat? There are also a wide range of lower-fat yogurt and cheese varieties on our supermarket shelves to choose from. These allow us to enjoy this food group as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle even if we are ‘watching our weight’. Remember, by cutting out an entire food group, the nutritional quality of the diet is very likely to be affected.

How can I incorporate milk into my diet?

Milk is extremely versatile. It’s ideal as a refreshing stand-alone drink. It’s perfect for smoothies or poured over breakfast cereals; or for use in cooking and baking. Did you know that heat has little impact on the calcium content of food? This means that cooked meals containing milk retain their calcium goodness and can help you meet your recommended daily intake from the ‘milk, yogurt and cheese’ food group as part of a balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.

Check out our recipe page to find a host of tasty dishes in which you can include milk.

Should I only worry about my bones in old age?

Bone health is something which many young people overlook, often considering it to be an issue only for older people. But make no bones about it – many lifestyle choices made during the younger years can have an impact on your bone health in later life!

A balanced diet, which provides ‘bone-friendly’ nutrients, is essential for our bone health at all life stages. Most people are aware of calcium as the nutrient commonly associated with bone health. Calcium is needed for the growth and development of bones in children, and the maintenance of our bones and teeth. Regular participation in weight-bearing activities (any activity which puts the full weight of your body on your feet and legs) is also important for bone health. Examples of such activities include running, rope skipping, dancing and most team sports.